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June 29 2015

Hurricane Attitudes of Coastal Connecticut Residents: A Segmentation Analysis

Hurricane Attitudes of Coastal Connecticut Residents: A Segmentation Analysis

As Superstorm Sandy battered the U.S. East Coast in 2012, residents in communities along the Connecticut shore received “mandatory” evacuation orders, but most people didn’t leave. A new report, "Hurricane Attitudes of Coastal Connecticut Residents: A Segmentation Analysis," based on a survey of 1,130 people living along the state’s coastline, provides insights into why some people decide to evacuate in the face of a weather emergency and why others try to ride out the storm. The report identifies five distinct groups of CT coastal residents based on their attitudes towards hurricanes: the “First Out” (21% of the population); the “Constrained” (14%); the “Optimists” (16%); the “Reluctant” (27%); and the “Diehards (22%).” The First Out are the most likely to evacuate during a hurricane whereas the Diehards are the least likely to leave. Each group, however, has unique characteristics.

 

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Topics: Audiences Climate Impacts Citizen Behavior Risk Perceptions Vulnerability & Resilience Format Reports Tags Risk Surveys Weather Topics Audiences Behaviors & Actions Climate Impacts
March 25 2015

Hurricane Perceptions of Coastal CT Residents

Hurricane Perceptions of Coastal CT Residents

Today we are pleased to release a new report: Hurricane Perceptions of Coastal Connecticut Residents. The report describes public attitudes and behaviors towards past and future hurricanes and tropical storms, based on a representative survey of 1,130 households along the Connecticut coast.

We find that most Connecticut (CT) coastal residents are ill-prepared for the significant safety and economic threats posed by severe coastal storms. Highlights include:

  • Only 21% of coastal CT residents in Zone A say they would evacuate in the event of a Category 2 hurricane if they did NOT receive an official notice; about six in ten (58%) say they would evacuate if advised to by an official.
  • About one third (34%) of coastal CT residents believe it would be safer to stay at home during a Category 2 hurricane; slightly less (31%) believe it would be safer to evacuate, and a final third (35%) say it’s about 50/50.
  • Coastal CT residents generally underestimate storm impacts: about half (52%) say damage from past storms was more than they had expected, whereas 19% say past damage was less than they had expected.

Co-author Anthony Leiserowitz appeared in this T.V. newscast about the study with dramatic footage of the CT coastline during a storm surge.

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Topics: Citizen Behavior Risk Perceptions Vulnerability & Resilience Format Reports Tags Risk Surveys Weather Topics Behaviors & Actions Climate Impacts
October 30 2014

Global Warming & the Rising American Electorate

Environmental groups are spending record amounts of money on environment and energy campaign ads this season. Candidates in hotly contested races are using climate change to distinguish themselves from their opponents, even though the issue is not top-tier for voters in the midterms.

An important driver of the prominence of global warming in American politics is how the issue resonates with the so-called Rising American Electorate (RAE) – Millennials (18-to-30 year olds), Latinos, African Americans, and unmarried women, among others. According to the Census, the RAE is a rapidly growing segment within the U.S. population and as a group, the RAE comprised nearly half (48%) of the electorate in 2012 according to national exit polls.

As the RAE votes in growing numbers, they will increasingly replace more traditional types of voters, such as older white men and married women. So what does the RAE think of global warming?

In our Spring 2014 survey, we asked a representative sample of American voters how a candidate’s support or opposition to reducing global warming would influence their vote. While all registered voters appear more likely to support a pro-climate action candidate (45%) over an anti-climate action candidate (17%), the RAE is particularly likely to do so when compared to traditional voters (51% and 12%, respectively).

 

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Politics / Elections Format Climate Notes Projects Climate Change in the American Mind Tags Demographics Topics Behaviors & Actions Beliefs & Attitudes Politics & Policy Support
September 24 2014

Beyond Partisanship on Climate Change

The visuals at the People’s Climate March in New York last Sunday conveyed more than just catchy slogans and clever words of inspiration. The signs and costumes and floats were messages to the world designed to create change.  This marcher is making a very clear statement that is supported by our findings, presented in our recent report, Politics and Global Warming, Spring 2014.                                                                                                                                                                                                   We find that while big differences do exist between conservative Republicans and Democrats, other Republicans look more like Democrats than their conservative fellow party members on numerous climate issues. Just one example among registered voters: Majorities of Democrats (88 percent) and moderate-to-liberal Republicans (61 percent) think global warming is happening. By marked contrast, only about one in four – 28 percent – conservative Republicans agree.

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Policy Support Politics / Elections Format Climate Notes Topics Behaviors & Actions Beliefs & Attitudes Politics & Policy Support
July 27 2014

Voters Will Support Pro-Climate Candidates With Pledges, Time, and Money

Voters Will Support Pro-Climate Candidates With Pledges, Time, and Money

Millions of registered voters  would sign a pledge to vote for, would work for, or would give money to candidates who share their views on global warming – if asked to by a person they like and respect. This suggests that global warming could become a more prominent electoral issue if campaigns engage and mobilize this potential “issue public.”

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Topics: Citizen Behavior Politics / Elections Format Climate Notes Projects Climate Change in the American Mind Topics Behaviors & Actions Politics & Policy Support
June 26 2014

Politics & Global Warming, Spring 2014

Politics & Global Warming, Spring 2014

A special report on the politics of global warming. Based on a nationally representative survey conducted in spring 2014, we analyze how Democrats, Republicans and Independents think about global warming, what policies they support or oppose, and the different types of political activism they are willing to engage in.

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Policy Support Politics / Elections Risk Perceptions Format Reports Projects Climate Change in the American Mind Tags Energy Risk Surveys Topics Behaviors & Actions Beliefs & Attitudes Politics & Policy Support
June 23 2014

The Genesis of Climate Change Activism

The Genesis of Climate Change Activism

We are pleased to announce our newly published article: "The genesis of climate change activism: from key beliefs to political action" in the journal Climatic Change
 

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Topics: Citizen Behavior Format Articles Topics Behaviors & Actions
May 27 2014

What’s In A Name? Global Warming vs Climate Change

What’s In A Name? Global Warming vs Climate Change

A nationally representative survey finds that the terms “global warming” and “climate change” often mean different things to Americans—and activate different sets of beliefs, feelings, and behaviors, as well as different degrees of urgency about the need to respond.

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Emotion / Affect / Imagery Knowledge / Climate Literacy Policy Support Risk Perceptions Format Reports Tags Emotion Knowledge Risk Topics Behaviors & Actions Beliefs & Attitudes Politics & Policy Support
February 19 2014

Americans’ Actions to Limit Global Warming November 2013

Americans’ Actions to Limit Global Warming November 2013

Highlights:

* Three in ten (29%) have joined or would join a campaign to convince elected officials to take action to reduce global warming.

* Nearly four in ten (36%) have joined or would join a campaign to convince elected officials to pass laws increasing energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy as a way to reduce America's dependence on fossil fuels.

* About half of Americans (53%) say they would sign a petition about global warming if asked by a person they "like and respect."

* About four in ten say that, if asked, they would sign a pledge to vote only for political candidates that share their views on global warming (39%).

* One in four Americans would support an organization engaging in non-violent civil disobedience against corporate or government activities that make global warming worse (24%) and one in six (17%) say they would personally engage in such actiivities.

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Topics: Citizen Behavior Consumer Behavior Energy Use / Conservation Policy Support Format Reports Projects Climate Change in the American Mind Tags Energy Surveys Topics Behaviors & Actions Politics & Policy Support
January 23 2014

Extreme Weather and Climate Change in the American Mind in November 2013

Extreme Weather and Climate Change in the American Mind in November 2013

Highlights:

  • Compared to the record-setting extreme weather disaster years of 2011 and 2012, the year 2013 in the United States was relatively calm, with no land-falling hurricanes, fewer tornadoes, and drought relief in the Great Plains. In turn, fewer Americans say they experienced an extreme weather event last year. People in the Northeast, Midwest, and South, however, were more likely to report experiencing extreme cold or a snowstorm in 2013 than they did in 2012.
  • Over half of Americans (56%) say “global warming is affecting weather in the United States.”
  • A large majority of Americans say their state and local government should make it a priority to protect public water supplies (78%), transportation/roads/bridges (73%), people’s health (72%), the electricity system (71%), agriculture (70%), and public sewer systems (69%) from extreme weather over the next 10 years.

 

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Topics: Attitudes & Beliefs Citizen Behavior Knowledge / Climate Literacy Risk Perceptions Vulnerability & Resilience Format Reports Projects Climate Change in the American Mind Tags Knowledge Risk Surveys Vulnerability Topics Behaviors & Actions Beliefs & Attitudes Climate Impacts
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